Death talk

It started as a fairly innocuous dinner conversation about my hair – coloring my hair that is.  I do that about every 10 weeks and this was that day.  Our older daughter was checking it out up close and noted that she couldn’t see the gray any longer.  This moved into a discussion on how long I would color my hair.  I said something about wanting to keep it up while young children are in our family.  Our younger daughter requested that I do it at least until they were teenagers.  We chatted a bit about wrinkles and the options for addressing those and then the conversation took a turn.

Around the corner of talking about parents aging, in the hearts and minds of these daughters, is the often present theme of death.  Deeply imprinted on our girls’ hearts is a fear of losing a parent.  We have had countless conversations of “what if” – Mommy dies and Daddy doesn’t, Daddy dies and Mommy doesn’t, both die and….you get the point.  They want to know specifics about what will happen to them, who will care for them, how in the world would we manage this thing?  It is a consistent fear in their young, impressionable hearts and minds and often a topic of conversation.

This was certainly not a focus or repeated conversation that we had with our sons.  There are probably several reasons for that.  One may be that we did not encourage the same depth of emotional expression that we do now.  But a professional once told me that “typical” children do not allow themselves to go there.  I don’t think our boys spent a lot of mental or emotional energy in this sphere. Yet for any adopted child, the scenario of losing a parent – to death or some other force – is not theoretical or “could happen” stuff.  It is a part of their story.

From my observation, at a very young age, this knowledge is present at a cellular level.   They KNOW that the loss of parents is well within the “could happens” of life.  It has in fact happened.  And as they grow cognitively, they know this truth of their own story on an even deeper and often more confusing level.  We have friends who have indeed lost a parent, and I’ll never forget the day that the reality that a child can also die entered their realm of possibilities.  Despite a desire to shelter them from these pains, that isn’t possible or healthy.  Walking a line of being trustworthy and truthful and meeting their great need to feel safe is a tricky one.

So, my response on that day was that it is unlikely that I die soon, but if that did happen, Daddy and I have plans and provisions in place to take care of them.  We have family and friends who would step up and in to help us through.  At the end of the dinner, our youngest said, “Mom, keep coloring your hair, and everything will be just fine”.  If it was only so simple.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My deep desire is to imprint something new onto their hearts – “For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord. “  We are on our way, but it is a long, slow journey.

About inpursuitofatoolbox

I am a God lover, wife of Mark and mom to 5 incredible children. Our 3 sons came to us by birth and our 2 daughters came through adoption.

Posted on August 22, 2012, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Slower the better.

  2. You teach me with every blog. Thank you Tricia

  3. Oh man… hard stuff. Sounds like you handle it with wisdom and grace.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: